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NAGRAT predicts that 8 out of 10 Ghanaian teachers would depart for better pastures

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As of October 2023, up to 10,000 instructors had departed the nation for wealthy countries. According to the National Teaching Council, this figure might be higher. "The mass exodus of our teachers from the country has not been adequately documented." The figure is growing by the day. As of October, we had accounted for 10,000 people who had gone. We couldn't put a number on those who did not travel through our borders. "So after October, those who have left, we've even lost count," Tindana Baba Joseph, Ashanti Regional Secretary of the National Association of Graduate Teachers, stated.

Everyone hears about healthcare staff shortages, but there is a growing issue in the education sector.

If given the option, at least eight out of ten trained teachers would leave Ghana and work elsewhere.

For the majority of these teachers, the terrible working conditions and contempt for the teaching profession in Ghana force them to relocate to richer nations in search of higher salaries.

Ibrahim Abubakar has been studying the consequences of Ghana’s large teacher departure.

As of October 2023, up to 10,000 instructors had departed the nation for wealthy countries.

According to the National Teaching Council, this figure might be higher.

“The mass exodus of our teachers from the country has not been adequately documented.” The figure is growing by the day. As of October, we had accounted for 10,000 people who had gone. We couldn’t put a number on those who did not travel through our borders.

“So after October, those who have left, we’ve even lost count,” Tindana Baba Joseph, Ashanti Regional Secretary of the National Association of Graduate Teachers, stated.

Absent financial restraints, Abubakar Bansi would have followed his colleagues who recently travelled to the United Kingdom to teach.

The father of three has been a teacher for almost two decades and presently teaches at the Armed Forces Senior High Technical in Kumasi.

“They’re complaining that we (teachers) are many, what’s the worry when some of us are leaving? As I stand here, if not because of money, I would’ve gone too because if I should go, I would be able to afford quality education for my children. The living conditions for teachers in this country are not easy. ”

Priscilla Afriyie went for a reference letter to help in her procedure of travelling overseas a few weeks after finishing her licence examinations.

The 25-year-old believes that the teaching profession is unappreciated in Ghana.

“People in Ghana do not value teachers, but we all know that developed countries do.” So why should I stay when better chances are available outside?”She inquired.

Despite Ghana’s teacher shortage, most certified teachers intend to migrate overseas in pursuit of better working circumstances.

Firdaus Ahmed is in her second year as a teacher trainee, but she has already decided to leave the country after she finishes.

To her, the Ghanaian teacher’s working conditions are insufficiently inspiring and tempting.

“If I have a chance, I will not hesitate to leave.” “There are a lot of teachers, so my departure will not cause anything to fall short.”

The high attrition rate in the education sector jeopardises the nation’s education and growth.

“You have highly qualified teachers leaving the shores.” Over time, instructors who have been at the grassroots level have grown to comprehend the annoyances. Aside from academic work, the morals of our pupils today, what we need to teach, and what methods to apply to control certain behaviours are all important considerations.

“Now, the vast majority of these teachers are fleeing the country.” When this occurs, education suffers as a result.

“The conditions are just not favourable, and the teacher today is worse off than before,” Atindana Baba remarked.

The Asantehene Otumfuo Osei Tutu II raised concern over the rapid flight of teachers and nurses from Ghana during a recent graduation ceremony at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology.

“It is undeniably disheartening to witness a significant exodus of our health and education professionals, all of whom are leaving our shores in search of more promising opportunities abroad.” While it is vital to recognise that human migration is not necessarily bad, it is also critical to recognise that if this phenomena continues unabated, it poses a significant threat to our species’ destiny.

“We must collectively work to transform our country into an enticing and compelling destination for our youth; a place where they have unshaken faith in their capacity to thrive and succeed,” he went on to say.

For individuals in the education sector, unless the government implements the necessary measures to improve teachers’ working conditions, more and more will leave the nation and seek employment elsewhere.

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Audrey Gadzekpo argues that an anti-gay bill is harmful to society

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In a conversation with Umaru Sanda Amadu on Citi FM's Eyewitness News, Prof Gadzekpo emphasised the critical significance of protecting rights and freedoms in a constitutional democracy. When asked if she thought the law was unwholesome, she responded, "Absolutely and without any doubt in my opinion," adding, "I don't even think they had a quorum. I saw an empty room on TV."

Professor Audrey Gadzekpo, Board Chair of the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD-Ghana), described the Anti-Gay Bill as damaging to social well-being.

Ghana’s parliament approved the tough law on Wednesday, February 28, which calls for a potential five-year jail sentence for forming or sponsoring LGBTQ+ groups.

The measure has received support from both main political parties and now seeks President Nana Akufo-Addo’s assent to become law.

Individuals who engage in banned actions might face a jail term ranging from 6 months to 3 years, while sponsors and promoters could face a 3 to 5-year prison sentence.

In a conversation with Umaru Sanda Amadu on Citi FM’s Eyewitness News, Prof Gadzekpo emphasised the critical significance of protecting rights and freedoms in a constitutional democracy.

When asked if she thought the law was unwholesome, she responded, “Absolutely and without any doubt in my opinion,” adding, “I don’t even think they had a quorum. I saw an empty room on TV.”

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NAGRAT advocates for reconsideration of the Free SHS policy

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According to a research by Africa Education Watch, the average government spending on Senior High School (SHS) pupils between 2017/18 and 2021/22 academic years. The survey found that the government paid GH¢1,241 per student under the Free SHS regime, whereas parents spent GH¢4,185 annually throughout the same period. This underlined the government's policy issues, as its budget credibility rating steadily fell over the 2019/20 and 2021/22 academic years. Based on this backdrop, NAGRAT is certain that a review will alleviate the burden on parents.

The National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT) has urged for a reconsideration of the policy so that parents who can afford it can pay their children’s tuition and other expenditures.

The Association feels that this will reduce part of the government’s burden.

According to research by Africa Education Watch, the average government spending on Senior High School (SHS) pupils between 2017/18 and 2021/22 academic years.

The survey found that the government paid GH¢1,241 per student under the Free SHS regime, whereas parents spent GH¢4,185 annually throughout the same period.

This underlined the government’s policy issues, as its budget credibility rating steadily fell over the 2019/20 and 2021/22 academic years.
Based on this backdrop, NAGRAT is certain that a review will alleviate the burden on parents.

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Chiefs stage demonstration against mining near Kwanyarko Water Works

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Local leaders led the community members in their intense opposition to the proposed mining project, citing probable environmental damage and the threat to their principal supply of water as grounds. Agona Kwanyarko is strongly reliant on the waterworks for clean and safe drinking water, and any disruption to its operation might have serious effects for the population.

Chiefs and villagers of Agona Kwanyarko, in the Central Region’s Agona East District, have taken to the streets to protest President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo and the Minerals Commission.

The rally is in response to the government’s stated plans to start mining near the Agona Kwanyarko water facilities.

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Local leaders led the community members in their intense opposition to the proposed mining project, citing probable environmental damage and the threat to their principal supply of water as grounds.

Agona Kwanyarko is strongly reliant on the waterworks for clean and safe drinking water, and any disruption to its operation might have serious effects on the population.

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During the demonstration, protestors held banners and chanted slogans protesting the government’s decision to allow mining near the waterworks.

They emphasised the importance of preserving their natural resources and demanded urgent action to prohibit any mining activity that threatened their access to pure water.

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