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You have no authority in court – Judge ‘fires’ OSP

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"You have no appellate jurisdiction over the High Court, whatever power you have," Justice Abodakpi stated. What exactly were the depositions? In the depositions (paragraphs 21-23 of the affidavits), the OSP accused Mr Bissue, among other things, of deceiving the court into issuing an interim injunction based on a non-existent arrest warrant. In the deposition, the OSP also chastised the court for issuing an interim injunction for 10 days, preventing the anti-graft agency from detaining and investigating Mr Bissue.

An Accra High Court has slammed the Office of the Special Prosecutor (OSP) for “overstepping its boundaries” and “abusing its powers.”

The court presided over by Justice Nicholas Mensah Abodakpi, was dissatisfied with certain depositions in the OSP’s affidavit, which was challenging a legal action brought by a former Presidential Staffer, Charles Cromwell Bissue, seeking to quash an arrest warrant allegedly obtained by the anti-graft agency to arrest and investigate him.

According to Justice Abodakpi, the OSP’s depositions (paragraphs 21-23 of the affidavit) were “scandalous,” an “abuse of office,” with the OSP acting as if it had control over the court.

As a result, the court knocked down the three paragraphs.

“The OSP has no appellate jurisdiction over the High Court.

“You have no appellate jurisdiction over the High Court, whatever power you have,” Justice Abodakpi stated.

What exactly were the depositions?

In the depositions (paragraphs 21-23 of the affidavits), the OSP accused Mr Bissue, among other things, of deceiving the court into issuing an interim injunction based on a non-existent arrest warrant.

In the deposition, the OSP also chastised the court for issuing an interim injunction for 10 days, preventing the anti-graft agency from detaining and investigating Mr Bissue.

“It is, thus, regrettable that although no court warrant was ever issued or existed, this Honourable Court firmly handed down an order of interim injunction against the first respondent, on an ex parte application, to restrain the respondent from discharging its statutory functions for ten (10) days.

It bears noting that a copy of the alleged warrant was never exhibited to the ex parte application, but the applicant had to bear the brunt of the judicial order all the same,” the OSP deposed.

Abuse of power

As the OSP tried to criticise the court for issuing the temporary injunction, Justice Abodakpi stated the depositions were scandalous.

The court stated that the OSP’s best choice was to challenge its verdict rather than condemn it in this manner.

“You cannot remonstrate and castigate the court over decisions it has made,” the judge said.

Justice Abodapki then asked Seth Ansong, counsel for the OSP, if he had a copy of the order issuing the interim injunction, to which counsel answered, “Not that I am aware of.”

The explanation from the OSP provoked a strong response from the judge, who queried how he took the depositions without reviewing the court’s judgement.

“Then why are you saying those things if you haven’t read the ruling of the court?

If you disagree with a court judgement, you can appeal to the Court of Appeal.

You are misusing your abilities.

You cannot condemn me (Judge).

“You haven’t seen the court’s decision and you’re saying those things,” Justice Abodapki stated.

Meanwhile, the case has been rescheduled for a hearing on January 15, 2019, during which a video tape of the Special Prosecutor, Kissi Agyebeng, providing interviews is anticipated to be aired in court.

Lawyers for Bissue said that Mr Agyebeng provided an interview in which he mentioned the arrest warrant, which has become a point of dispute in the case.

The OSP, on the other hand, has accused Bissue of deceiving the court about the existence of the stated arrest warrant, which led to the issuing of the temporary injunction.

The OSP claims that it has arrest authority and hence did not require a court order to carry out an arrest.

As a result, the OSP has suggested to the court that it would cross-examine Bissue’s lead attorney, Nana Agyei Baffour, to ascertain the veracity of his deposition to his affidavit, which said that the OSP had secured an arrest warrant for Charles Bissue.

Justice Abodakpi further ordered the parties — Bissue, the Attorney-General (representing the Kaneshie District, which allegedly issued the warrant), and the OSP — to provide written responses by the next postponed date.

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Power crisis: We had a maintenance hiccup – ECG boss

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"We are experiencing major maintenance issues; the current issue has nothing to do with fuel." You rely on a power plant to generate around 360 megawatts, and at 4 p.m., the gas emergency safety valve malfunctions. What are you doing? It's a machine. "The machine failed us and we kept on saying that it's a machine issue that we were trying to fix," he said. Recognising the impact of the mechanical breakdown on the power supply, he apologised for the lack of timely contact with the public. "I must apologise to Ghanaians, when it started we should actually have the confidence to have a chat with everybody and put out a statement."

Samuel Dubik Mahama, Managing Director of the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG), has ascribed frequent power disruptions in Accra and other locations to maintenance concerns rather than fuel-related problems.

Numerous neighbourhoods have been experiencing inconsistent power supply for several weeks without prior notification from ECG.

Speaking on Starr FM on Thursday, February 29, 2024, Mr Mahama informed listeners that ECG is working hard to rectify the issues and restore electricity to the impacted areas.

According to him, the current challenges are mostly related to severe maintenance concerns, not fuel shortages.

“We are experiencing major maintenance issues; the current issue has nothing to do with fuel.” You rely on a power plant to generate around 360 megawatts, and at 4 p.m., the gas emergency safety valve malfunctions. What are you doing? It’s a machine.

“The machine failed us and we kept on saying that it’s a machine issue that we were trying to fix,” he said.

Recognising the impact of the mechanical breakdown on the power supply, he apologised for the lack of timely contact with the public.

“I must apologise to Ghanaians, when it started we should actually have the confidence to have a chat with everybody and put out a statement.”

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Over 70% of people between the ages of 15 and 49 discriminate against persons with HIV

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The survey also found that rural regions had a larger percentage of people with discriminating views (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) than urban areas (73.4% for females and 67.3% for males). "The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males)." According to the GSS research, the Ahafo area has the greatest rate of discrimination against people living with HIV (87%). The Savannah region follows at 86.8%, with the Oti region at 86.4%.

According to a Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) research, more than 70% of men and women aged 15 to 49 who are aware of HIV have discriminatory attitudes towards persons living with the virus.

These attitudes include the view that HIV-positive children should not attend school with HIV-negative children, or that they should avoid purchasing fresh vegetables from a shopkeeper living with HIV.

The GSS released these numbers on International Zero Discrimination Day, March 1, 2024, with the motto “Save lives: Decriminalise.”

The survey also found that nearly eight out of every ten females (78.4%) and seven out of every ten men (72.1%) aged 15 to 49 who are aware of HIV had discriminatory attitudes towards persons living with the infection.

“Nationally, almost eight in every 10 (78.4%) females and seven in every 10 (72.1%) males aged 15-49 who have heard about HIV have discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV. The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males).”

The survey also found that rural regions had a larger percentage of people with discriminating views (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) than urban areas (73.4% for females and 67.3% for males).

“The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males).”

According to the GSS research, the Ahafo area has the greatest rate of discrimination against people living with HIV (87%). The Savannah region follows at 86.8%, with the Oti region at 86.4%.

“Among females aged 15 to 49 in eight regions – Ahafo (87.0%), Savannah (86.8%), Oti (86.4), North East (85.9%), Northern (85.7%), Upper West (83.8%), Western North (84.4%) and Upper East (80.1%) – over four in five have discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV.

“In comparison, three regions – North East (85.2%), Northern (83.1%) and Oti (81.5%) – have more than four in five males aged 15-49 with discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV,” GSS’s stated in its report.

The survey also emphasised that those with greater education are less likely to have discriminatory attitudes towards people with HIV than those with little education.


“Individuals with discriminating views are more than twice as likely to have no education as those with secondary education or above. Discriminatory attitudes among females aged 15–49 vary from 91.5% for those with little education, falling through elementary (89.3%), secondary (78.9%), and more than secondary (44.8%).

“Among males aged 15-49 with no education, 90.0% exhibit discriminatory attitudes, compared to 86.8% for those with primary education, 73.6% for secondary education, and 43.4% among those with secondary or more education.”

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IES predicts a slight increase in petrol, diesel, and LPG prices

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“Given the Ghana cedi’s poor performance, coupled with the rising prices of petroleum products on world fuels market, IES expects prices to increase marginally in the early days in the month of March [2024]”.

Consumers could expect more marginal rises in the price of petrol, diesel and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in the next few days, assuming no intervention, according to the Institute for Energy Security.

According to the energy research group, this is mostly attributable to the deteriorating Ghana cedi.

“Following the continual price increases recorded by all refined petroleum products under consideration on the global fuels market over the last two weeks, the local market is anticipated to follow these developments.
“Given the Ghana cedi’s poor performance, coupled with the rising prices of petroleum products on the world fuels market, IES expects prices to increase marginally in the early days in the month of March [2024]”.

World fuel market

According to the IES, the Global Standard & Poor (S&P) Platts platform tracking of refined petroleum price data issued at the end of trade on February 26, 2024, indicated diesel, petrol and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) prices at $871.75, $840.43, and $599.48 per metric tonne, respectively.

The released pricing statistics for the time showed an increase in refined petroleum products under examination.

Specifically, the net price impacts revealed a 1.56%, 3.24%, and 2.92% rise in diesel, petrol, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas, respectively.

Local fuel market performance

The second pricing window of February saw petroleum product prices rise at the pumps, in accordance with local fuels market expectations.

The IES tracked the actions of Oil Marketing Companies (OMCs) and found that liquid fuel prices increased by an average of GH¢0.45 for diesel and GH¢0.30 for petrol per litre. LPG prices increased by GH¢0.65 per kilogramme.

According to an IES examination of gasoline pricing data from the past two weeks, the national average price for petrol is GH¢12.24 per litre, while diesel is GH¢13.32.

LPG costs GH¢13.65 per kilogramme.

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