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Adisadel College controversy should have been handled out of court – Osei Owusu

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Adisadel College controversy should have been handled out of court - Osei Owusu

Joesph Osei-Owusu, the First Deputy Speaker of Parliament, has expressed reservations about prosecuting the perpetrator of the Adisadel College attack.

The Deputy Speaker, addressing Fettehman Senior High School’s 10-year anniversary celebration, believes that the problem may have been handled by the school’s administration rather than the offender being tried in a general court.

“We should look at how we bring up children in this country since it is becoming a challenge. This kind of upbringing is important. There is no need for him to be that violent towards another student. If we discuss this in isolation, we would miss it. What happened in the school is a reflection of what is happening in the country. We think we are not supposed to punish students and this is how we pay for it as a country.

“There is nothing wrong with students being at each other, but when it gets beyond regular bullying, it is bad. I regret that it has been taken to the court since this matter could have been addressed in the school, but the Attorney General thinks otherwise,” Joseph Osei-Owusu said.

Despite criticising the student’s heinous behaviour, Hon. Osei Owusu says the offender should have been counselled so that he might concentrate on his education for the sake of his future.

In the footage, a 17-year-old final-year student is shown squeezing his colleague’s neck and then pounding his head on a metal bed, injuring the victim.

Mr Osei Owusu has also voiced concern over deteriorating discipline standards, questioned the moral upbringing of Ghanaian youngsters, and urged for more intentional attempts to establish discipline in children.

“Whatever has happened should be left in the past and look forward to reforming the students involved in the video. We are copying blindly, and we must go back to our roots as Ghanaians,” the First Deputy Speaker noted.

Meanwhile, on the topic of Fettehman Senior High School’s lack of suitable facilities, the First Deputy Speaker advised the Member of Parliament to voice concerns on the floor of Parliament for further action, while encouraging pupils to preserve strong moral values and integrity.

The school has an infrastructure deficit since the facilities on campus are insufficient for the approximately 1500 pupils. Students had no choice but to eat under the trees.

Aside from these issues, the school has started a project to build a cottage for the headmistress of the school, but it needs help from the government and well-meaning Ghanaians to finish it.

The school’s board chairman, Joseph Annan, stated that the institution requires assistance to accommodate over a thousand pupils.

“We have a lot of infrastructure deficit as a school, ranging from the lack of accommodation on campus for teachers to the lack of a dining hall among others. This has made it difficult for the school to function” the Board chairman of the school, Joseph Annan said.

“With a little effort we have begun constructing the bungalow for the headmistress, but we will need support from corporate Ghana and the government to finish this project” the board chairman noted.

The Regional Director of Education for the Central Region agrees that infrastructural issues on campuses of most senior high schools are substantial, but the directorate is working hard to overcome these challenges.

“The challenges of infrastructure on the campuses of some schools in the region cannot be left out, but we are working hard to ensure that support comes from government and well-meaning Ghanaians” Regional Director of Education Emmanuel Essuman said.

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Power crisis: We had a maintenance hiccup – ECG boss

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"We are experiencing major maintenance issues; the current issue has nothing to do with fuel." You rely on a power plant to generate around 360 megawatts, and at 4 p.m., the gas emergency safety valve malfunctions. What are you doing? It's a machine. "The machine failed us and we kept on saying that it's a machine issue that we were trying to fix," he said. Recognising the impact of the mechanical breakdown on the power supply, he apologised for the lack of timely contact with the public. "I must apologise to Ghanaians, when it started we should actually have the confidence to have a chat with everybody and put out a statement."

Samuel Dubik Mahama, Managing Director of the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG), has ascribed frequent power disruptions in Accra and other locations to maintenance concerns rather than fuel-related problems.

Numerous neighbourhoods have been experiencing inconsistent power supply for several weeks without prior notification from ECG.

Speaking on Starr FM on Thursday, February 29, 2024, Mr Mahama informed listeners that ECG is working hard to rectify the issues and restore electricity to the impacted areas.

According to him, the current challenges are mostly related to severe maintenance concerns, not fuel shortages.

“We are experiencing major maintenance issues; the current issue has nothing to do with fuel.” You rely on a power plant to generate around 360 megawatts, and at 4 p.m., the gas emergency safety valve malfunctions. What are you doing? It’s a machine.

“The machine failed us and we kept on saying that it’s a machine issue that we were trying to fix,” he said.

Recognising the impact of the mechanical breakdown on the power supply, he apologised for the lack of timely contact with the public.

“I must apologise to Ghanaians, when it started we should actually have the confidence to have a chat with everybody and put out a statement.”

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Over 70% of people between the ages of 15 and 49 discriminate against persons with HIV

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The survey also found that rural regions had a larger percentage of people with discriminating views (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) than urban areas (73.4% for females and 67.3% for males). "The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males)." According to the GSS research, the Ahafo area has the greatest rate of discrimination against people living with HIV (87%). The Savannah region follows at 86.8%, with the Oti region at 86.4%.

According to a Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) research, more than 70% of men and women aged 15 to 49 who are aware of HIV have discriminatory attitudes towards persons living with the virus.

These attitudes include the view that HIV-positive children should not attend school with HIV-negative children, or that they should avoid purchasing fresh vegetables from a shopkeeper living with HIV.

The GSS released these numbers on International Zero Discrimination Day, March 1, 2024, with the motto “Save lives: Decriminalise.”

The survey also found that nearly eight out of every ten females (78.4%) and seven out of every ten men (72.1%) aged 15 to 49 who are aware of HIV had discriminatory attitudes towards persons living with the infection.

“Nationally, almost eight in every 10 (78.4%) females and seven in every 10 (72.1%) males aged 15-49 who have heard about HIV have discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV. The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males).”

The survey also found that rural regions had a larger percentage of people with discriminating views (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) than urban areas (73.4% for females and 67.3% for males).

“The percentage with discriminatory attitudes is higher in rural areas (85.5% for females and 78.1% for males) compared to urban (73.4% for females and 67.3% of males).”

According to the GSS research, the Ahafo area has the greatest rate of discrimination against people living with HIV (87%). The Savannah region follows at 86.8%, with the Oti region at 86.4%.

“Among females aged 15 to 49 in eight regions – Ahafo (87.0%), Savannah (86.8%), Oti (86.4), North East (85.9%), Northern (85.7%), Upper West (83.8%), Western North (84.4%) and Upper East (80.1%) – over four in five have discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV.

“In comparison, three regions – North East (85.2%), Northern (83.1%) and Oti (81.5%) – have more than four in five males aged 15-49 with discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV,” GSS’s stated in its report.

The survey also emphasised that those with greater education are less likely to have discriminatory attitudes towards people with HIV than those with little education.


“Individuals with discriminating views are more than twice as likely to have no education as those with secondary education or above. Discriminatory attitudes among females aged 15–49 vary from 91.5% for those with little education, falling through elementary (89.3%), secondary (78.9%), and more than secondary (44.8%).

“Among males aged 15-49 with no education, 90.0% exhibit discriminatory attitudes, compared to 86.8% for those with primary education, 73.6% for secondary education, and 43.4% among those with secondary or more education.”

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IES predicts a slight increase in petrol, diesel, and LPG prices

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“Given the Ghana cedi’s poor performance, coupled with the rising prices of petroleum products on world fuels market, IES expects prices to increase marginally in the early days in the month of March [2024]”.

Consumers could expect more marginal rises in the price of petrol, diesel and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in the next few days, assuming no intervention, according to the Institute for Energy Security.

According to the energy research group, this is mostly attributable to the deteriorating Ghana cedi.

“Following the continual price increases recorded by all refined petroleum products under consideration on the global fuels market over the last two weeks, the local market is anticipated to follow these developments.
“Given the Ghana cedi’s poor performance, coupled with the rising prices of petroleum products on the world fuels market, IES expects prices to increase marginally in the early days in the month of March [2024]”.

World fuel market

According to the IES, the Global Standard & Poor (S&P) Platts platform tracking of refined petroleum price data issued at the end of trade on February 26, 2024, indicated diesel, petrol and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) prices at $871.75, $840.43, and $599.48 per metric tonne, respectively.

The released pricing statistics for the time showed an increase in refined petroleum products under examination.

Specifically, the net price impacts revealed a 1.56%, 3.24%, and 2.92% rise in diesel, petrol, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas, respectively.

Local fuel market performance

The second pricing window of February saw petroleum product prices rise at the pumps, in accordance with local fuels market expectations.

The IES tracked the actions of Oil Marketing Companies (OMCs) and found that liquid fuel prices increased by an average of GH¢0.45 for diesel and GH¢0.30 for petrol per litre. LPG prices increased by GH¢0.65 per kilogramme.

According to an IES examination of gasoline pricing data from the past two weeks, the national average price for petrol is GH¢12.24 per litre, while diesel is GH¢13.32.

LPG costs GH¢13.65 per kilogramme.

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